Frost Musicology Lecture Series

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GET STARTED
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Request Info
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Visit
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An older gentleman in a tan suit is speaking on stage with a microphone in his hand with a piano in the background. An older gentleman in a tan suit is speaking on stage with a microphone in his hand with a piano in the background.

Each of these four weekly lectures in September 2017 with renowned musicologist Frank Cooper, Frost Research Professor Emeritus, will be held at the Weeks Center for Recording and Performance, Clarke Recital Hall. Tickets are available individually or as a four-ticket series.

To buy the 4-lecture package, click here.



France & Her Revolutions, Lecture 1—Ideas as Crucibles

Thursday, September 6, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Weeks Center for Recording and Performance, Clarke Recital Hall

Frank Cooper, lecturer
When radical thinkers in 18th century Paris rallied the masses to revolt, they didn’t just topple the Bastille. Their Republican ideals spurred writers, composers, and painters to envision a new way of life beyond ingrained tradition. The arts were affected more profoundly with Napoleon’s move into politics and onto a throne.

 

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France & Her Revolutions, Lecture 2—Romanticism’s Explosions

Thursday, September 13, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Weeks Center for Recording and Performance, Clarke Recital Hall

Frank Cooper, lecturer
The 1830’s and 40’s upended the standards for journalists, poets, playwrights, musicians, and artists, forcing innovators to join together while making room for individual genius. The result was a flowering of inspiration not seen in one city since Renaissance Florence: Hugo, de Musset, Courbet, Meyerbeer, Delacroix, Adam, Berlioz, Chopin…


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France & Her Revolutions, Lecture 3—Romanticism’s Spread

Thursday, September 20, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Weeks Center for Recording and Performance, Clarke Recital Hall

Frank Cooper, lecturer
As Romanticism flooded Europe, cultural life broke free from the inhibitions of Classicism and surged with new creativity. Verdi and Wagner soared, as did Liszt, Brahms, Dvorak, the Mighty Handful, artists Corot and Daumier, and writers Dumas, Poe, Baudelaire, and Emerson. Popularity bred confidence–until radicalized Romanticism sparked Realism and more.


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France & Her Revolutions, Lecture 4—Modernity in Paris

Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Weeks Center for Recording and Performance, Clarke Recital Hall

Frank Cooper, lecturer
The advent of the 20th century saw Paris once again become a wellspring of revolutionary artistic ideas. Mallarmé, Verlaine, and Rimbaud shattered poetry, while Braque and Picasso’s Cubism splintered the pictorial plan. Impressionism opened the way for Rodin, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, and Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes arrived with radically polytonal music and expressive movement.


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